How to Build Language Skills: Farmers Market Theme

February 12, 2018

How to Build Language Skills: Farmers Market Theme


 As parents, we want to help our children learn the best that they can, but sometimes wonder if we are doing the “right” things to give them an extra boost. Creating a language-rich environment for your little ones helps them develop critical lifelong skills while having fun! Hands-on play and interaction is essential in teaching children social skills, problem solving, speaking and listening skills, motor skills, and so much more. We have many gift sets that are language-rich and excellent for promoting early developmental skills while playing. Today, we are focusing on the Farmers Market Set. Here are some tips to help you get the most out of the collection.

  • Has your child ever been to a farmers market? Talk about what it was like or what they think it is like. This helps children learn how to make predictions and addresses expressive language. Pose questions to yourself aloud, such as “I wonder what vegetables they will have this week," and then answer the question aloud as well.
  • Have your child pretend they are the farmer at the market! Role-play what you would say. Now, switch roles, and have the child be the customer. This is perfect for friends or siblings to do, too!  Practice the concept of “how many.” Count how many pennies, quarters, or dollars there are. Have your child touch each item while counting it.
  • Paint your own market bag! Use the paint, paintbrush, and bag provided to paint your own design! Tip: Cut a bell pepper across the middle, apply paint to cut portion, and then stamp it onto the bag to do your own veggie prints.
  • Play a guessing game using the pretend play food. Practice describing how the food feels, its shape, size, and color, and have the other person guess the item being described. This helps children increase their vocabulary skills.
  • Play the Green Market game. This fun game is perfect even for children who are just beginning to play board games. It helps children work on colors, food groups, matching, sorting, and turn-taking. You can ask your child which foods they like or dislike, and why.
  • Read the book, Mrs. Peanuckle’s Vegetable Alphabet. Have your child tell you about what they see on each page.  Asking your child open-ended questions about the story helps to expand their expressive language skills. Reading the story also addresses comprehension skills.

I hope you have found this information useful. Are you signed up for our newsletter? We like to send out special discounts and info just for our subscribers. We also are in the beginning stages of building a parent community on Facebook. You can join our Parenting Collective by Lola & Lark group here if you would like to be part of our community.

Until next time,

Katie Whitman, M.A., CCC-SLP

Founder & Executive Director of Lola & Lark

Pediatric Speech-Language Pathologist


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